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Be Aware - New Contact Form Scam Involving Infographics and a Tiny URL

by Jo Shaer, on August 21, 2013

From the contact form on my website

Luis Hill
luishill87@yahoo.com

Telephone
0017849632

Website URL
http://ca.com

Message:
Hi,
Thank you for using our Infographic (http://tiny99.com/***** - details removed just in case you decided to click it or check it out and it is something nasty) in your
post:
lollipoplocal.co.uk/facebook***
We’ve noticed that you haven’t linked back to the original source
of infographic. So, I wanted to reach out to you, to request that if
you may link back to the original source. We’ll highly appreciate
it.
Please replace the graphic with following code:
Or you may place the following source link at the bottom of
infographic:
Source
I'll be waiting for your kind response.
Thanks,
Luis Hill

In fact, he was right. I had not linked out to the people who had originally produced the infographic - I had embedded it using the code from an established infographics provider. I always try to credit the original provider but in this case something had gone awry.

However the website that he listed in response to my contact form's questions had not actually produced this website.

And the two places where he asks that we replace the graphic with some code or add a source link, there is no actual code.

Further investigation - by clicking the tiny link - took me to an online book store coupon code.

I don't really understand how such contact inbox spam works but this is a more careful exploitation of it. Previously, messages had been a series of disparate letters and numbers. Others had a link that didn't go anywhere. I had always assumed that these were some kind of robots deliberately designed to target opportunities on websites where links could be placed. I see no SEO value in putting a link into a company's contact form inbox. And if the link is gibberish, then there isn't even the possibility that they are looking to promote some form of brand awareness in a very odd way.

I am concerned that there is the possibility that this tiny link may now have put some form of virus on my computer?

I just don't get the point of this type of spam.

So I googled luishill87 and I found this great post from Geoff at halfblog.net

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